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Episode 122 | Q&A – A Transitioning Market, Money, Habits, Tax Deductions and What It’s Really Costing You

It’s that time again … a few questions from you and a few answers from the boys!

Oh, before we give you a tiny tease about today’s podcast … just a huge shout out for being SO supportive about our technical glitch last week. Our inbox was flooded with all of your emails and concerns—please know that our hearts’ burst (with love) and we missed you all too! We really did. But we’re back and better than ever this week. (With an epic guest next Thursday we’ve got The Stig running the server like a pro.)

Right … to today’s Q&A! It’s the time of a transitioning market. So things are starting to balance out in the property scene. The boys will fill you in on the nitty gritty; but, guess what? This is an empowering time for buyers!

Think Question. Think Answer. Think Golf. Blame Bryce for his legendary metaphors.

 

  • Question on debt reduction from Allen:

I am trying to get into a better money management system and have just a few questions.
I currently have 1 personal loan of $22,000 and 2 credit cards both roughly $5000 each. In your previous podcasts about credit card management and The Money SMARTS System you suggest paying off whichever debt charges the most interest first. Well, the personal loan charges more than the credit cards in the long run and has more to pay off although the credit cards are of smaller amount but it is still high, which would you recommend paying off first?

  • Question on how to work out a property’s true value from Laura:

When monitoring an existing Investment Property’s capital growth, and trying to do this in an objective, non-biases and reliable method, can you please compare and contrast—get the advice—just relying on a real estate agents sales appraisal vs. a proper bank valuation?

My wife and I bought a house (PPOR) in Croydon Vic 2.5 years ago, which has since appreciated by nearly 20%. We are looking at buying our first investment property this year, around mid-year. We had a child last year, my wife will be going back to work part time mid-year and is currently on maternity & LSL. My salary will be about $100k more than hers.

Will it make sense to get the investment loan out in my name so that the losses can be claimed against my greater income? For some reason she is apprehensive about this idea, which I’m not sure why because we are married anyway and the titles can still be put in both our names even though the finance is in my name. Is this worth considering this or should everything just be in both our names, joint loans the like?

 

And here are the Free Resources mentioned in today’s podcast:

 

If you like this Q&A episode (A Transitioning Market, Money, Habits, Tax Deductions and What It’s Really Costing You), don’t forget to rate us on our iTunes channel (The Property Couch Podcast) and our Facebook page. Any questions or ideas? Feel free to drop us your thoughts here: http://thepropertycouch.com.au/topics/

Episode 119 | The Power of Compounding

Smart Money Management. Savings. Leverage. Compounding interest.

That is basically what we are talking about in today’s podcast as inspired by two of our listeners who wrote in. Now, rewind a few episodes, and you’ll find the boys quoting Albert Einstein famous words, “Compound interest is the eighth wonder of the world. He who understands it, earns it… he who doesn’t… pays it.” And today’s focus is all about getting the foundation RIGHT, finding the SWEET spot for your money management habits and understanding WHAT delayed gratification is all about.

One of the questions that we asked the listeners today is,

Would you take a million today or take a cent now and double the amount every day for the next 30 days?

Tune in to find out the numbers behind this question and here are the Free Resources mentioned in today’s podcast:

 

Just in case you’re wondering, here’s what the two listeners wrote in:

 

  • From Chris:

Hey guys. Love the podcast. I’ve told so many people about you guys. Out their flying the flag. One day I’ll probably knock on your door for a job. Seriously.

I find that one of the biggest advantages/disadvantages to building wealth can of be determined as to whether you are or aren’t on the same page as your partner when it comes to finance and household spending. I meet so many people in life who are either money savvy (to some degree) or they just aren’t. I love that we all have different passions in life, it makes the world go round, but wouldn’t it make life, relationships and wealth building easier if we all LOVED the concept of making our money work harder for us. We were all money SMART 🙂 *Thanks rubbish Australian education curriculum!

So my challenge is to you. Not an easy one. Do one podcast that in the most effective mainstream fashion, gives those that aren’t ‘interested’ yet, just a taste of how they MUST be money smart. Because…it is not actually that hard, how it can impact their lives so dramatically and how they should take a bigger interest in how to make their money work for them now if they want options of living a wonderful life. A life of experiences. Inspire them. One podcast I can make my loved ones listen to, to try flick that switch in them to take more control of their finances with joy. Like when I read Rich Dad Poor Dad. I know how amazing compound interest is, I know how amazing leverage is, but so many people just don’t. Therefore they don’t know why they should be delaying gratification. So they simply choose to spend.

In a time that is crazy busy for you guys building a business and living your own family lives, well done on giving so much back to society. You will never know how great an impact you have had on generations to come.

 

  • From Greg:

Hi Guys

I just watched the first video you’ve done with realestate.com.au. Congratulations on the partnership and great work as usual.

Just one comment on the first video. The savings/investment glass got filled with what was left over. This goes against many of the gurus (The Richest Man in Babylon, Robert Kiyosaki etc) who all say “pay yourself first”. So, in the video, the savings/investment glass should have its share first (whatever amount the person has decided) and then the other glasses divide up what’s left over.

Keep up the great work.

 

If you like this episode (The Power of Compounding), don’t forget to rate us on our iTunes channel (The Property Couch Podcast) and our Facebook page. Any questions or ideas? Feel free to drop us your thoughts here: http://tpcaustralia.wpengine.com/topics/

Episode 116 | Q&A – How does Guarantor Loan actually works, Fixing a Joint Venture, Investing in WA and more

It’s Question and Answer time!  Now, we answered a few questions in the last episode but realised that we wouldn’t be able to respond to all of your questions at this rate, so we will be doing a Facebook Live very soon. Stay tuned for that!

On another note, there’s an exciting announcement at the end of this episode so make sure you stick around. And here are the questions that we would be answering today:

 

  • Question on Guarantor Loan from Kate:

My partner and I earn a combined gross income of roughly $130,000 annually. We have a small amount of savings – about $5000 (remember we’re getting married). But really nowhere near the amount needed for a deposit on our first home. Listening to your episode about guarantors got me thinking. Is it possible to borrow the full amount for an invest-grade property in Newcastle? Do banks really loan 105% with interest only repayments so that we can continue putting money into an offset account? Or are we better to wait and rent and continue saving?

My parents have been lucky enough to own a home in Sydney that has enjoyed the crazy house price growth. Their home would be worth at least $1.5 million at the moment. How long would my parents need to be guarantors – would it be until we had saved 20% of the loan? Perhaps in our offset account? Or would it be until the full amount was paid down?

My dad is from the generation of debt is bad and avoids risks. If you thought this was a smart move, do you have any tips on how to explain the risk/benefits so that he can understand?

 

  • Question on “To Hold or Sell” from Warren: Hi ‘couchers’, thank you for your entertaining, informative, and thought-provoking podcasts. I’d like to know what your thoughts are on rescuing a situation where someone has an investment property they’ve had for 10 years that isn’t performing. Cut the losses and look to replace it, or hang onto it? (I bought this place at age 20 on apprentice wages, it was all I could afford) Thanks! (specifics: paid $195k, current market value $240k, current rent $270/wk)

 

  • Question on Property Investing in WA from Daniel:

My partner and I recently bought a duplex (2 bedrooms, 1 bathroom, 2 living rooms, 475 m2) in Spearwood for $400,000. We have $112,000 equity in the property and $73,000 cash in our offset. Our salaries are $50,000 p/a for my partner and $71,000 p/a for myself, and we do not plan to have children for another 5 years. There is an opportunity to buy the second duplex (also a 2 bedroom, 1 bathroom, with a small granny flat at the back) for $385,000. The site is zoned R40 on 950 m2 (we see a 4 property potential), 3 km from the new Port Coogee Marina, the North Coogee development estate and the potential South Fremantle Power Station development bringing 6,000 new high-density houses/apartments into the area. We are 300 m from the local shopping centre and 5 km from the satellite employment hub of Fremantle (Bryce’s old hood). It ticks all the lifestyle boxes bar being near a train station (it is currently challenging to access the freeway to the Perth CBD). My two part question is:

  1. I am currently weighing up the opportunity cost. What is your inference of Spearwood as a potential “wave rider” suburb piggy backing off the growth of the coastal development? Do you feel that it would have long-term, consistent capital growth or a short term upswing, followed by a flattening capital growth and thus be better to buy into a blue chip area?
  2. As a first time investor, would it be wise to buy the adjacent duplex and land bank the asset, then develop the land after we have acquired several more properties in our portfolio or focus on the subdivision straight off the bat?

 

  • Question on Joint Venture from Tristan:o

I am in a bit of a bind and require some help. I currently have 4 properties. PPOR, a house in country VIC (Nathalia) that my father rents, a house in Frankston (that’s had 10% growth in 5 months!) and the front house on a sub dived block in Seaford.

The last 2 properties were purchased with friends as tenants in common.

I wanted to try and get another property with just my wife and so (as my friend has changed his plans a bit) I spoke to a well-regarded mortgage broker and they told me that the banks have changed the rules and that now they take the full loan amounts of the split properties and only half the rent!?

This destroys my serviceability. I am now not sure what to do, my friend is moving interstate and will not be ready to buy again for 2 years. (which I think my turn into 5 years) and I am keen to keep purchasing.

Should I concentrate on paying down the debt on my PPOR (280k worth 750k) or look at selling one of the joint houses (to gain the serviceability)?

 

And here are Free Resources mentioned in today’s podcast:

 

 

If you like this Q&A episode (How does Guarantor Loan actually works, Fixing a Joint Venture, Investing in WA and more), don’t forget to rate us on our iTunes channel (The Property Couch Podcast) and our Facebook page. Any questions or ideas? Feel free to drop us your thoughts here: http://tpcaustralia.wpengine.com/topics/

Episode 111 | Q&A – Borderless Investing, Loan Redraw, Suburb Demographic and more

Can’t believe it has been 11 weeks since our last Q&A! We’ve got quite a line-up of great guests on the show for the past couple of months so for today’s podcast, we will be doing a Q&A instead. Thanks for sending in your question and Bryce and Ben will be answering questions from:

 

  • Bernard on Borderless Investing: I love your show; it’s really given me a different perspective from some other property educators, and it’s one of these differences which gives rise to the following issue. You speak a lot about being a borderless investor and buying quality assets in those locations where the market is in the right stage of the cycle. At the moment, this might mean Brisbane or Hobart or Adelaide or wherever. That’s all good. You are also clear that Sydney and Melbourne are the places which will grow most long term. That’s all good too. If I’m only going to buy 4-5 properties to secure my retirement though, as you advocate in your book, I certainly want to be buying the best long-term performers that I can. I know that done well, I can make good money doing this in smaller markets, but long term I wouldn’t expect to do as well as in the larger metropolises.

If I was buying ten houses, I could carry some weaker assets, but with four it’s obviously vital to get them right. How would you advise someone who already owned a couple of (hopefully!) well-selected properties in Brisbane or Adelaide or wherever who was able to re-invest? Should they hold off, build up a bit of equity and increase their cash buffer before looking at Sydney or Melbourne when the heat has come off there? Or would you suggest buying again and taking the risk that they will never get into the larger markets?

  • Alisdair on Loan Redraw Facilities: Can we have a finance expert tax expert come on the podcast? I have a loan where I have paid in extra to the redraw, not offset. I had a strategy to break the loan and refix for a few reasons. The rate is significantly lower. I’m hoping I can claim the break fees as a cost, reducing their effect. Also I want to pay my interest out of the redraw. Can this be done? I feel the break fees are permitted, but the part where I pay interest from the redraw seems an impossible dream due to a mixed purpose loan affect and that the ATO considers it tax avoidance. Any guidance in this matter?
  • Lakhwinder on Location Research: I have been listening to your podcasts while driving, thank you so much for such a priceless info you share with us. I recently started my property investment journey bought new house in Western Sydney to get government benefits and bought two investment properties in Loganlea after rezoning, after listening to your podcasts I realised I didn’t apply most of the filters you guys talked about. Both my properties are over the median price of suburb. Both are over 6% yield so not that painful to hold.

First investment property 3bed 2 bath 2 living areas 800msq with pool for $400k. Second 4beds 2baths 800msqr $380k. Westen Sydney property (owner occupier)did great, bought in end of 2014

By June 2016 property revalued at $150k more without landscaping done.I know you guys talked about Brisbane few times but it will be great to listen what you think about logan area and recent rezoning of Loganlea. Questions:- is it ok pay higher price for the properties (houses)that fall within the high-medium density or residential core for a future land bank?

  • Clayton on buying off the plan properties: Hi, I would LOVE to get your opinion on buying off the plan properties and what to look out for. This course of action has been put forward by a mortgage broker/real estate developer in Brisbane who will benefit from both the commission on the mortgage and the property itself (they have openly disclosed this). The property will be an investment and NOT my PPR. Love the show and keep up the good work.

 

If you like this Q&A episode (Borderless Investing, Loan Redraw, Suburb Demographic and more), don’t forget to rate us on our iTunes channel (The Property Couch Podcast) and our Facebook page. Any questions or ideas? Feel free to drop us your thoughts here: http://tpcaustralia.wpengine.com/topics/

Episode 099 | Q&A – Tips For Investing Late In Life, Selling Your Home, Fixing A Downward Portfolio Spiral and more

As Bryce puts it today, we’ve made it to “99, not out!” and with just 1 episode to go before the big 1-0-0, we’re back to provide you with another Q&A Session. In today’s episode, Bryce and Ben give advice on whether to sell your home, tips for investing later on in life, what to do when your property portfolio is falling into a downward spiral, and more. Today’s questions are from the following listeners:

 

  • Fernando on whether or not to sell his home: My wife and I moved from SYD to MELB four years ago without not even knowing where its north was. We rented an apartment in the beautiful East Melbourne for a year as we wanted to enjoy this beautiful city life style but also knowing that we needed to buy a property after that time so we were not building someone else’s future. So we bought “with our hearts” a 3 beds, 2 bath, studio + man cave OLD house out in Donvale with the “vision” of slowly renovate it while starting a family, be surrounded by green, live the Australian dream and on top of that, generate a good growth on the property in a medium term. We love the area BUT… Now, after 2 kids, our cash flow is quite dry and we need to do something about it (classic isn’t it).

Our first bet is to sell as Donvale is not a good suburb from a rent perspective (Yield), put whatever money we can make from the sell – We bought at 520K, the median is 650K and we’ve been slowly renovating a few things, but again, without enough cash to finish it, we are not expecting making a huge profit – into an investment property and then became “Rentvestors”, we wouldn’t mind to sacrifice moving out to a suburb where rent is half what our current mortgage is. In our raw calculations, in 3 – 5 years we could be saving enough to buy the second investment property.

I believe the best things Australia has to offer are for free (parks, security, culture, etc.), so for now, not living in the suburb we’d prefer is not such a big deal when thinking on our medium-long term goals which are given to our kids the best that we possible can and start a passive income strategy for our future ASAP. On the other hand, if we keep the property, we’d need to put a considerable amount of cash on top of the rent in order to pay the mortgage, so our savings wouldn’t be enough to think in buying a good investment property any soon. We will regret not keeping this property… I can guarantee you that but we don’t see any other immediate solution.

  • Monique on whether or not to sell her home: Taken your advice, but what now? Given the projected apartment oversupply, should we sell our inner suburbs 1bdr flat to put towards our next home? Or is it still a good investment worth holding on to?
  • James on interest only loans:Part 1: 2 years ago my wife and I purchased a property 5km from the Brisbane CBD for $530,000. Unfortunately we only spoke to 1 bank, didn’t seek advice and fixed the whole loan for 3 years at 5.05% so have no offset and no way of paying more off the loan than prescribed fortnightly payment amount. After listening to your podcasts and just starting to read your book just this week, we have since found a decent mortgage broker and are considering refinancing and setting up the money smarts structure. We are considering an interest only loan, as discussed in your podcast, to give us the flexibility to purchase another property over the next 2-3 years, but currently we are getting conflicting advice from our financial planner who is against interest only and our mortgage broker who is telling us ‘cash is king’ in your offset account and we should consider it. The idea is to pay the same amount as we are paying now with our P&I loan but go onto interest only 100% variable (4.3% int rate) and let the cash stack up in the offset. What are your thoughts on this?
  • Ronie on investing late in life: Hi Guys, Loving the podcasts. Only started a month ago and am devouring them. Ben, I don’t know if you’ve been told this before, but when I’m listening to you, I can’t help but associate your voice to radio celeb Fitzy. Anyway, my question is, how to start in the property investment after 40. We are self employed, and although have a few savings, is not near enough the 20% asked for a deposit. We don’t even have our own house. Should we work towards that first? Thank you guys!
  • Lyell on the next steps to take in fixing his property portfolio: : I bought my first property at 22 in Kalgoorlie WA. I know i know, mining towns are dangerous. We bought that property is 2010 and have see no capital growth what so ever. Property was bought in 2005 for $197k and we purchased it for $340k in 2010. Not a bad profit for the previous owners. As soon as we bought it, growth stopped. We are however getting 7% gross yield (leased at $460pw). We then bought a house on a big block in Ballajura in the north eastern suburbs of Perth. We bought that for $450k in 2014. Unfortunately that house has dropped by around 7%. We now love in this home. But we leased it at $435pw. We are now at 90% LVR. Both properties are 3 x 2’s with the Perth property on 760sqm. This house was bought for $128K in 1998 prior to us. Very disheartening for a young couple. Could i get a rough idea on what you would do in the situation (in a completely general sense)?
    Also, could you guys discuss ways to get yourselves out of sticky situations like this? I think a lot of people will be feeling this kind of pinch right now (especially WA).

 

 

 

If you like this Q&A episode (Tips For Investing Late In Life, Selling Your Home, Fixing A Downward Portfolio Spiral and more), don’t forget to rate us on our iTunes channel (The Property Couch Podcast) and our Facebook page. Any questions or ideas? Feel free to drop us your thoughts here: http://tpcaustralia.wpengine.com/topics/

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